Premarital and Postmarital Agreements

2018-2019 change represents the new year

The Texas Legislature convenes every two years, with 2019 being one of those. Each session, proposed new laws get introduced that will affect family law in Texas. It is expected that a bill will be introduced to remove no fault divorce and require proof of fault grounds for all Texas divorce and extend the waiting period to finalize a divorce (currently 60 days). Neither of these proposals are expected to gain much traction. Reform of the child protective services system will, however, be a hot topic for the legislative session given all of the litigation there has been criticizing how CPS handles matters ineffectively.


Continue Reading Changes from 2018 and looking ahead to 2019 for Texas family law

Dictionaries generally define “bank” as a financial establishment for the deposit, loan, exchange, or issue of money and for the transmission of funds. In contrast, “broker” is defined as an agent who acts as an intermediary or negotiator, especially between prospective buyers and sellers; a person employed to make bargains and contracts between other persons in matters of trade, commerce, or navigation. According to the Houston Court, these definitions illustrate that banks and brokers are distinguishable, particularly with respect to the scope of their respective services; banks tend to offer a broader spectrum of financial services than brokerage firms.
Continue Reading Bank accounts and brokerage accounts are not the same in a premarital agreement

Even if you aren’t getting married, couples can still reach agreements about their relationship or joint property in Texas. When two people live together but are not married, a cohabitation agreement can define the parameters of their financial relationship. For example, a cohabitating couple could agree as to how their money will be held jointly and separately, as well as who pays which of the household bills. If an unmarried couple plans to purchase a house together, a cohabitation agreement can address each party’s ownership interest, how the mortgage will be paid, and how to handle the house in the event the parties end their relationship.
Continue Reading What if we aren’t getting married – can we still agree on stuff?